Last updated: February 10. 2014 12:17PM - 459 Views
Chris Cooper Managing Editor



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The Lewisburg City Council voted to develop a Code Enforcement Board recently, which will help clean up the city and take action on numerous complaints its received on citizens not keeping their properties clean.


Lewisburg is a small city and has never had an enforcement board in its recent history to assure its ordinances are being followed. However, there are now some properties within the city that are in clear violation and are making the city look bad. This has prompted the council to seek advise from city attorney Ken Williams about what it can do to make citizens clean up their acts.


A Code Enforcement Board is an arm of the city and is responsible for making sure the city s ordinances are respected and followed, as well as implement fines or litigation if necessary. From grass length and piled up junk, to dilapidated structures that cause safety concerns, there are ordinances that each city has regulating these issues.


According to attorney Williams, the city’s construction of a Code Enforcement Board will give them more teeth to battle these violations in a court of law if necessary. Of course that is not where the board is wanting to start out. With boards like these, citizens are usually given a chance to clean up their properties, or cut their grass before having to venture into litigation. There is usually a warning given first and a time period to comply with the city’s laws. If not followed, then a NOV (Notice of Violation) is usually issued which can bring with it a fine. If after that a citizen still does not comply, the issue can be taken to court and leans can be placed on properties.


The idea of developing a Code Enforcement Board has been kicked around for a few years now, however, the city of Lewisburg never quite brought it to the table until now.


“This is really something we have needed for awhile now,” said city clerk Angela Swinney. “We are getting to many complaints from too many people that things are not being done right, and had no way of addressing that.”


Councilman Jeff Laster said the move to start a Code Enforcement Board is a step in the right direction.


“This will allow us to maintain the city’s laws,” said Laster. “It’s really something that should have been done a long time ago, we just failed to get it in place until now.”

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