Last updated: March 31. 2014 12:35PM - 2098 Views
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Caitlynn Oberhausen, of Auburn, recently wrote, illustrated and published a book on the facts and myths of type 1 diabetes, a topic she is all to familiar with, having been diagnosed herself before attending college.


“It was very surprising when I found out I had type 1 diabetes,” said Caitlynn, a 2011 graduate of Logan County High School. “It definitely took some adjustment, but I’m okay, and pretty much live a normal lifestyle.”


Caitlynn said through being diagnosed, she wanted to take her experience and educate those who are around people with the condition. She feels it’s important to bring about awareness to diabetes which breaks down the walls of fear others may have who either work, go to school with, or are friends with, those who have it.


As part of Caitlynn’s graduate school thesis at Western Kentucky University (WKU), she decided to write a book about what was true and false about type 1 diabetes. This was the perfect opportunity. Caitlynn’s book is entitled, “The Truth About Type 1 Diabetes: The Myths Exposed.”


“A lot of people don’t realize the facts about type 1 diabetes. People like myself who have it can live a normal life. We just have to watch what we eat and make sure our levels are where they need to be,” said Caitlynn. Knowledge is power and by educating people about type 1 diabetes, it can help those who have it fit in.


Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. Only 5 percent of people with diabetes have this form of the disease. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. With the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, even young children can learn to manage their condition and live long, healthy lives.


“I can’t imagine what young people in middle school must go through having type 1 diabetes, and the feelings of wanting to fit in. It’s hard enough getting through school at that age without any added struggles,” said Caitlynn.


Caitlynn’s book breaks down those added struggles and explains to kids what actually happens when someone has Type 1 Diabetes. The illustrations, which she drew herself, are a warming addition to the book, one which children can relate to.


“My focus is the peer groups who have people in their lives with type 1 diabetes,” said Caitlynn. “I want them to understand and not fear.”


Caitlynn’s book can be found on Amazon.com. A portion of the proceedings from her book will go to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), with the remainder going to purchase more books to be donated to schools. Caitlynn says she didn’t do this project to make money, but to help others.


Caitlynn recently had the opportunity to read her book to 3rd-5th graders at Olmstead School. She said they were very welcoming and seemed to love the book. Afterwards she asked the students questions about type 1 diabetes.


“It was a great experience,” said Caitlynn. “I believe the kids really learned about what was read, which is my goal.”


Caitlynn is majoring in Hospitality Management and Dietetics with a concentration in Nutrition and Dietetics and Food Chemistry at WKU. She is also very active in the WKU Marching Band. She is the daughter of Dickie and Cheryl Oberhausen.


Caitlynn says she wants to use her degree to someday help those who have diabetes.


Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. Only 5% of people with diabetes have this form of the disease.


In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. With the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, even young children can learn to manage their condition and live long, healthy lives. - See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/type-1/#sthash.ehjebxdW.dpuf


Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. Only 5% of people with diabetes have this form of the disease.


In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. With the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, even young children can learn to manage their condition and live long, healthy lives. - See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/type-1/#sthash.ehjebxdW.dpuf

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